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tips

Documenting Your Charitable Donations

Many people make donations to charities whose work they support, but if you are planning to take a tax deduction for your gift, you must have the proper paperwork. Assembling the right documentation can also be tricky because the requirements vary based on whether the donation is cash and on the value of your gift. If you donate less than $250 in cash, for example, a canceled check, credit card statement or similar record may be sufficient, but if you give more, you will need a written acknowledgement from the charity. An additional tax form—and possibly an appraisal—may be needed for non-cash donations, depending on their value. Of course, the organization itself must also qualify as a charity under IRS rules.

We can offer advice that will make it possible for you to fund the causes you believe in and qualify for the deductions you deserve. We can also help you incorporate charitable giving into your long-term tax and estate planning. Be sure to contact us with all of your questions on charitable giving or any other financial concern.

Don't Be Taken in by Phony IRS Requests

The phone rings. The caller says they are from the Internal Revenue Service and they claim you owe taxes and must submit payment through a wire transfer or prepaid debit card. Or you receive an email supposedly from the IRS asking you to share your bank account, credit card or Social Security number. What should you do?

The sad truth is that many scammers pretend to be IRS agents as part of identity theft or other criminal activity. If you receive a surprising or suspicious communication purportedly from the IRS, we would urge you to call us immediately. We can help you identify a bogus request for information and work with you to respond to a legitimate IRS contact. You can also call the IRS directly at 800-829-1040 to verify any communication you receive.


What's So Great about CPAs?

You may not have asked yourself that question in so many words, but you may have wondered what sets CPAs apart from other financial professionals. The answer in short: A lot.

We typically begin our careers with years of college and graduate education. To become licensed, we must take the demanding Uniform CPA Examination, which tests our knowledge on a wide range of business topics over a total period of 14 hours. In addition, we have to meet an experience requirement and then be licensed by a State Board of Accountancy to practice.

But it doesn't stop there. Once we become CPAs, we also must meet continuing education requirements to update our knowledge of new business developments as well as commit to a strict code of ethical standards. Armed with this rigorous training, we're on the job year round, ready to help individuals and businesses address their own unique challenges.

If you want more information about our firm and how we can help you resolve all your financial issues, don't hesitate to contact us.

Barbara Fulp CPA - Logo Barbara H. Fulp, CPA, PFS, PLLC Certified Public Accountant
Wilmington, NC
Telephone: 910.458.1312
© 2018 Barbara H. Fulp. All rights reserved.